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This is how a 4-pole starter solenoid switch is connected. One of the larger terminals is connected to the hot wire coming from the battery, the second large terminal is connected to the starter, the first smaller terminal (S) connects to the ignition switch, the second small terminal connects to either ballast resistor (R) or ignition coil (I) and is generally unused. Make sure to ground the frame.

Solenoids provide a safe and easy way of activating and deactivating any kind of electrical ON and OFF components. They allow to activate high current circuits and manage them by switching on two contacts that need considerably less power to be activated than the current that the solenoid is going to handle.

When a small current is applied to a solenoid, a coil located inside generates a magnetic field that moves a plunger that drives the high current switch to the closed position. Please watch this video for more detailed information on 4-pole solenoid wiring (schematics):

Get a hands-on experience of 4-pole solenoid wiring with this video:

Wiring process of solenoids

A starter solenoid usually has four terminals: two terminals are used for the high current circuit and the other two are the low current terminals of the solenoid, which are connected to the inner coil, and are the ones that trigger the high current device on the high power end.

Four connectors in a solenoid generally include:

  • 2 small connectors for the solenoid switch
  • 2 thicker and bigger connectors for the high current switch

Assuming that you are going to perform this wiring in a car, you are probably going to use a 12V battery. By convention, it’s advised that you use black wire for negative and red wires for positive.

If you want, you can use brown or orange cables on the high current end of the circuit, to distinguish them from the solenoid to battery connections. The color of those wires will depend on whether you are switching ON and OFF the negative or the positive cable of the device that you are going to handle with the solenoid.

Below you will find a simple schematic that will show you how to wire a solenoid switch to any device that you need. It’s a very simple job as you can see:

Final thoughts

Solenoids are very practical devices for automation. Another advantage of solenoids is that the elements that they handle don’t have to be in the same circuit. That’s why solenoids are very reliable and relatively simple forms of actuators and their use is very common in different fields of electricity and electronics.

Feel free to save the infoPin below for your future Reference :

 

This article is for informational purposes ONLY and is NOT a replacement for professional advice!


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4 Comments

    • David

      Hi Roger, if the solenoid relay goes out, the vehicle or truck won’t start. In the case of the 4 pole starter, the solenoid must be grounded to the case to be able to work, and on other starters, the starter solenoid has a rod that probably will detach too, preventing to do its job.

    • David

      Hi Jerry, if you have it wired like it’s displayed on the video, the yellow wire is coming from the ignition switch, it’s an “input”. Please tell me more if you want so I can help you.

      David

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