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DISCLAIMER: AS AN AMAZON ASSOCIATE I EARN FROM QUALIFYING PURCHASES. THIS POST CONTAINS AFFILIATE LINKS THAT WILL REWARD ME MONETARILY OR OTHERWISE WHEN YOU USE THEM TO MAKE QUALIFYING PURCHASES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE READ MY EARNINGS DISCLAIMER.

The number one reason for the RV being plugged in and having NO power is a tripped GFCI outlet. The good part is that this is an easy fix and all you have to do is reset it. Any kind of wire overload will trip your breakers or blow fuses and therefore interrupt the circuit. Take care of it and you will get your power back!

If you find that your breaker does not let you reset, you probably have a bigger problem on your hands like a short circuit. It is not recommended to solve this problem yourself and calling a professional electrician is the desired solution.

Most of the time, the breakers trip because you OVERLOADED the circuit. Try to remember what exactly you tried to turn ON at the same time when this problem happened.

It is also a good idea to know the power consumption of your appliances to see what could have triggered the overload. If your usage goes above what your 30-amp or 50-amp system allows, your breakers will trip or fuses will blow and you will have NO power.

If none of the above suggestions work for you, let’s narrow down what could possibly be wrong with your RV.

Let’s troubleshoot the electrical system!

First of all, do you actually have power coming in? In order to find that out, you need to check for the following:

  • Surge protector. Do you have a green light ON or OFF? If the light is OFF, then there is no power coming from the pedestal hookup and you need to contact RV camp management.
  • Multimeter readings. If you are not using a surge protector, then check the shore power outlet with some kind of voltage measuring device (this should be done anyway before plugging your RV in and risking your appliance’s “health”). If you get no voltage reading, then the problem is obvious.

If everything is fine with your shore power, then there is something wrong with your RV power system that prevents you from using it. Following problems are also quite common and could cause a “NO power” issue:

#1. Battery problem

Now, let’s check your home batteries. If you are wondering why (since you are not using them anyway while being plugged in), the answer is that batteries take on themselves the overload issues that your converter cannot handle.

If they are “out of order” and your appliance demand will exceed your converter’s capability to safely provide you with needed power, it will overheat and eventually will require a replacement. In this case, taking care of your batteries is a small price to pay.

Your batteries need to be in good condition with clean terminals and filled with distilled water to appropriate levels. While checking your batteries and finding some corrosion or acid stains, you can clean them with baking soda and water mixture (video):

The white powder on your battery should be removed with care since it is an acidic substance. Using goggles for eye protection and rubber gloves to make sure nothing gets on your skin is highly recommended!

Here is a good video on how to use a professional battery cleaner:

Your batteries could also be damaged or leaking. It is not worth it going on the road with a battery like that and you need to replace it.

#2. Converter problem

There could also be a problem with your converter. One of them is that converter’s fuse (or fuses) could be blown! They are usually located in the back of the converter:

It could also be REALLY OLD!!! Check out this video:

#3. Wiring problems

If nothing of the above suggestions seems to be the problem, there could be some frayed or old wiring involved. Now it’s a good time to call your local electrical service in order to inspect your motorhome or trailer’s wiring because it is very difficult to find bad wires without special tools.

Feel free to save the infoPin below for your future Reference :

Conclusion

It is such a bummer to find you that you’ve got no power as you come back from a long trip and for God’s sake, want to relax! This is rather frustrating, especially if your RV batteries are “out of steam” and need a recharge.

On the road, it is very common not to notice some electric system problems, since you are mainly using your battery for the home system. If they are not major (like frayed wiring or faulty equipment), they could be generally solved by yourself in a matter of minutes.

** Warning! Do NOT attempt to do any complicated electrical troubleshooting if you are not qualified to do so! Leave it to professionals!

Hope this article helps you to identify what you need to do to get your power back. Best wishes and happy problem-solving!

This article is for informational purposes ONLY and is NOT a replacement for professional advice!


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